Connect with us

Survival Skills

How To Survive Aircraft Accidents

Published

on

Aircraft accidents are one of the things most people fear. But how does one survive a crash if it does happen? Well, we’ll soon find out.

How To Survive Aircraft Accidents: Flight or Fright?

Do you know the chance of dying in a commercial plane crash is 1 in 11 million? Surprisingly, studies have shown above 90% of the passengers survived in a plane crash. Just like every mode of transportation, each has its risks. And more often than not, preparation is the key to increasing your chances of survival. Here are a few tips which might help you survive an aircraft accident.

 

1. Be Prepared

Be Prepared | How To Survive Aircraft Accidents

 

 

Nobody wants it to happen but we must always prepare for a worst case scenario. The following are some of the things you need to do in the event of aircraft accidents:

  • Wear sturdy and comfortable clothing
  • Wear sensible shoes like lace-up shoes so it will be easy for you to exit the aircraft and prevent cuts and flammable liquids on your feet
  • Sit at the tail end of the aisle nearest the exit which has a 40% higher chance of survival
  • Always read the safety card and pay close attention to the pre-flight safety instructions
  • Make a mental note on how many seats are there between your seat and the exit
  • Always wear your seatbelt
  • Consider placing a jacket on your lap which can be used as a heat shield in case of a fire or protect you from the cold if ever you do get out alive

 


Raven_Steel_Ad-07

2. Brace! Brace! Brace!

There are two standard brace positions you can take before impact. Mythbusters made a test and suggests the crash force from your body is channeled to the chair in front of you if you’re sitting in the brace position through a series of tests. Crash test dummies were also used in some studies on the brace position and prove that it will save your life. Keep your feet well behind your knees to protect your legs. You will need them to bring you to the nearest exit. Keep this position until the plane has come to a standstill.

 

3. Act Fast

Aircraft Accidents

Forget your luggage and exit the plane as fast as you can. Studies show the actual impact is not what kills most of the passengers but what happens afterward like being burned to death or drowning.  Research also shows you have about 90 seconds to exit the plane.

 

4. Follow The Floor Lights

Aircraft Accidents

If the cabin fills up with smoke, you should stay low to the floor. Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth, if possible a wet one. You wouldn’t want to pass out due to smoke inhalation. Clear air is at the bottom part of the fuselage while the smoke and the heat are at the top end. Crawl your way out by following the floor lights to the exit.

 

5. Inflate Later Not Now

Don’t inflate your lifejacket while you’re still in the plane. Should it start to fill up with water, you will have a hard time swimming out and end up drowning. This is because the jacket will force you up towards the roof and keep you trapped.

 

6. Get As Far Away As Possible

Aircraft Accidents

Once out, you need to get upwind and be at least 500 feet from the aircraft. This will keep you from getting smothered in the smoke, heat from the fire and inhaling toxic chemicals.

 

7. Check Yourself For Injuries And Stay Put If Possible

Apply first aid procedures to any cuts, abrasions, broken bones and other injuries if you have the knowledge to do so. Refrain from moving too much if you have internal injuries so as to aggravate it.

Research and statistical data have been made over the years taken from previous aircraft accidents or plane crashes. No one can predict how a plane will crash and where it is going to occur. But one thing is for sure, if you don’t prepare for it, you might just end up dead. Just follow these few easy tips and you might just come out of it alive. Maybe taking up a few lessons on learning survival skills and probably bringing a survival kit with you might up the chances of surviving until rescue arrives.

Aircraft Accidents | How To Survive Aircraft Accidents

Do you have any more tips to share? Please don’t hesitate to place them in the comments below.

Here is an article on 377 survival hacks and skills which might come in handy in a disaster situation.

Check out How To Survive Aircraft Accidents at https://survivallife.com/aircraft-accidents-survival-tips/

Follow us on FacebookInstagramTwitterPinterest, and Tumblr

Disclaimer: All content on this site is for informational purposes only. Please read our full disclaimer here.

 

 




Comments
Continue Reading
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. InklingBooks

    March 3, 2017 at 5:18 PM

    The TSA won’t let us carry real knives, but there are ones designed solely for cutting seat belts. Having one makes sense for cars, so you might carry that one on plane flights.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Trending

Copyright © 2020 Survival Life. This copyrighted material may not be republished without express permission. The information presented here is for general educational purposes only. MATERIAL CONNECTION DISCLOSURE: You should assume that this website has an affiliate relationship and/or another material connection to the persons or businesses mentioned in or linked to from this page and may receive commissions from purchases you make on subsequent web sites. You should not rely solely on information contained in this website to evaluate the product or service being endorsed. Always exercise due diligence before purchasing any product or service. This website contains advertisements.

[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]
[first_name]
[first_name]
[email]
[email]
[index]
[index]
[email]
[email]
[first_name]
[first_name]
[email]
[email]
[if lt IE 9]
[if lt IE 9]
["_setAccount", "UA-29124457-2"]
["_setAccount", "UA-29124457-2"]
["_setDomainName", "contest.io"]
["_setDomainName", "contest.io"]
["_setAllowLinker", true]
["_setAllowLinker", true]
["_trackPageview"]
["_trackPageview"]
['Years', 'Months', 'Weeks', 'Days', 'Hours', 'Minutes', 'Seconds']
['Years', 'Months', 'Weeks', 'Days', 'Hours', 'Minutes', 'Seconds']
['Year', 'Month', 'Week', 'Day', 'Hour', 'Minute', 'Second']
['Year', 'Month', 'Week', 'Day', 'Hour', 'Minute', 'Second']
[email]
[email]
[email]
[email]