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9 Ways To Prep When You Have A Child | Survivalist Prepper Podcast [LISTEN]

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This week on the podcast we have a special guest Morgan from RoguePreparedness on with us to talk about preparedness with children and some challenges she recently encountered.

Morgan recently went on a multi-state 30 day trip with her husband and 2 children and shared some of her takeaways with us. Experiences like this are a great way to find the flaws in your bug out plans, and gives you an idea about how difficult bugging out with children could actually be.

RELATED: How To Build A Children’s Survival Kit

How To Prep With a Child

1. Teach Them to Respect the Essentials

Children these days have no idea about what life is like without technology, and they have no idea where food and water actually come from. If the internet goes out for just an hour they have no idea what to do, and when all the spaghettiO’s are gone they act like there is nothing in the house to eat.

Teach them about food and water, teach them about electricity. Teaching them not to take for granted that the lights just magically come on when you flip a switch, and the water might not always flow from the faucet will give them an appreciation for what they have.

2. Teach the Basics of Prepping

You hear the stories all the time, and it might even be you. “I’ve been a prepper my whole life, and didn’t know It.” Teaching your children about canning, gardening, food storage and self-reliance will teach them that it’s just what smart people do.

Camping and survivalist skills are also a great way to get the ball rolling. Teaching them the basics of fire, water safety, building shelter can introduce your children to the importance of preparing.

3. Get Them Involved in Prepping

Children are always trying to emulate their parents, this can be good or bad. If we teach our children good habits and give them a few small things that they are responsible for they will have a bigger sense of involvement.

Let them join in when you are cooking, gardening or building something. They might not actually be “helping” you, but the fact that they are involved gives them an idea about how the process works.

4. Watch What You (And They) Say

Be careful about labeling what you are doing as “prepping” to children, they love to brag and because they talk to others who might not understand what prepping is, it might lead to unwanted attention. We know what prepping is all about, but because of shows like Doomsday Preppers some people have misconceptions.

Also take the opportunity to teach them about operational security when you can. This is the same concept as “never take candy from a stranger”, we spend so much time thinking about security we need to make sure our children don’t give away the farm.

5. Let Small Children Build Their Own Emergency Bag (With Your Help)

Even if they build a bug out bag full of toys let them put what they want in the bag. Ask them why they decided they needed that and use this as an opportunity to teach them about emergency preparedness.

As time goes on you will see that some of the toys will be replaced with more useful supplies. As they become more responsible you can give them supplies to add and explain how important they are.

Read more on Survivalist Prepper.

How do you prep with a child? Share your thoughts in the section below.

Up Next:

10 Life Skills We Should Teach Every Child

Supplemental Learning For This Year’s Online Schooling

5 Crucial Stealth Camping Tips

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