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23 Common Spices That Should Be In Your Pantry Now

by Thursday, May 16, 2013

MRE’s, mac and cheese, powdered potatoes, and canned vegetables are going to get really old, really fast after the SHTF.

But if you take a little extra time to include herbs, spices, and seasonings into your supply lists, you can completely change the flavor of otherwise bland meals.

I don’t always follow the rules and tend to be a fan of the “throw it in, how bad could it be” cooking method when it comes to spices.

With many of the prepackaged survival meals on the market, it would be pretty hard to ruin a meal by adding some. (Which in a survival situation you really don’t want to do.)

Common Spices:

  1. Salt
  2. Black Pepper
  3. Crushed Red pepper
  4. Chili Powder
  5. Garlic Powder
  6. Garlic Salt
  7. Minced Garlic (If you can’t tell, I like garlic 23 Common Spices That Should Be In Your Pantry Now )
  8. Onion Powder
  9. Cinnamon (also great on fruit)
  10. Bay Leaves
  11. Parsley
  12. Oregano

Uncommon Spices:

These mostly include ingredients mentioned above and are way too high in sodium, but they sure can turn bland food into something delicious and take all the guess work out of seasoning.

  1. Meat Spices ( those mixed spice things that are made for grilling) One of my favorites is Montreal Steak Seasoning by McCormicks.
  2. Mrs. Dash
  3. Cajun Seasoning
  4. Chinese 5 spice
  5. pickled peppers ( jalapeno,  banana, and peperoncini are my all time favorites)
  6. Wasabi Powder
  7. Tobasco sauce ( Or my favorite Cholula… goes great on eggs)
  8. Sriracha Sauce
  9. Balsamic Vinegar
  10. Oils ( olive oil is great and can be infused with other flavors for all kinds of uses)
  11. Honey (Not technically a spice, but an unlimited shelf life that can be used to sweeten everything from coffee to baked goods is never a bad thing to have around!)

The Great thing about spices is that they never actually spoil. But over time, spices will lose their potency and not flavor your food as intended and you may need to experiment on how much more spice needs to be added.

As a general rule, whole spices will stay fresh for about 3-4 years, ground spices for about 2-3 years and dried herbs for 1-3 years.

What Else?

What other spices and seasonings would you most want to stock to keep your meals flavorful?

Read more with these related articles from our site:

The 10 Pantry Items Worth More than Gold

27 Surprising Uses for Salt

The Top 35 Reasons You Need To Stockpile Vinegar NOW!

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45 Comments on "23 Common Spices That Should Be In Your Pantry Now"

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mariowen
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mariowen
3 years 3 months ago
0

If you do any canning, you will want a good supply of pickling spice – also, of course, you will need to have canning salt on hand. I have that stored up for future canning. I just decide on my favorite canning recipes and stock those spices that are needed. It will be hard to pickle things without them. Another option is to grow your own and have them handy as much as possible.

Gnomemaster
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3 years 3 months ago
0

You forgot a few, especially cumin[comino], nutmeg, fenel and basil.

Michael
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Michael
3 years 3 months ago
0

Basil (esp. with tomato-based dishes)
Cilantro (dried)
Cumin (esp. for Tex-Mex)
Ginger (dried)
Rosemary
Soy sauce
Vanilla

mariowen
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mariowen
3 years 3 months ago
0

When I cook, I just head out to the garden and gather any herbs needed for my dinner. It is so much better tasting than the stuff in a jar. I have learned to accommodate my taste to my garden. I grow what I like and I like what I grow.

gena
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gena
3 years 3 months ago
0 I like the Lawrey (sp?) seasoned salt, no MSG, and you can get original or italian flavored. And I have bought salt substitute since I read it is a good thing to have for your medicine chest since it used potassium instead of traditional salt, and then if someone has potassium loss while medical care is unavailable, it can be used to get their potassium levels back to normal, which could prove to be life or death. I have my own herb garden and am growing several varieties of peppers this year, and plan to pickle as much as… Read more »
Schneewitchen
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Schneewitchen
3 years 3 months ago
0 When it comes to spices, think about some of the foreign cuisines you and your family enjoy! Curry, if you like it is a great spice combination to hide the flavor of weird meats you may have to consume post SHTF. I also stock up on taco/chili packets for same reason. If you want you can buy the individual spices in bulk very cheaply for either, at your local Indian or Asian Grocery. You can mix them up yourself. Simply look on the ingredients of the Taco packet and know they are listed by most prominent to the least… Read more »
Schneewitchen
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Schneewitchen
3 years 3 months ago
0 Another thing for those who have the space, is to grow your own Parsley, Oregano,Sage, Rosemary, Thyme, Mint and many others. They are ridiculously EASY to grow, and when they are mature, cut lengths and hang them to dry in a cool place, or place them in a brown paper bag to dry. When dry, crumble off the stems and store as you would any spices. Many herbs are perennials, making them even easier to grow because there is no need to plant them every year. Some woody herbs ( sage, thyme, rosemary) can be replicated from green cuttings… Read more »
Chris
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Chris
3 years 3 months ago
0

Schneewitchen…when it comes to spearmint and peppermint, make sure you plant them in a container. A friend gave me some spearmint plants close to 10 years ago and we now have spearmint in our blackberries, lilies of the valley, and growing in between the rocks in our rock wall. We clean it out periodically and it comes right back. As long as you can contain the roots, you should be good to go.

JJM
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JJM
3 years 3 months ago
0

This spring I started and planted 30 different herbs for flavor and medicinal uses. Primarily to get accustomed to growing, saving and usage. About half are doing good enough to start using and drying. Another quarter are slow to start and barely hanging in. Another quarter don’t sprout or die off in infancy. In general, herbs are easy to grow.
What I do need is a quick/condensed list of Herbs and Usage. ie expansion of Michael’s:
Basil (esp. with tomato-based dishes)
Cumin (esp. for Tex-Mex)

BrthrLee
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BrthrLee
3 years 2 months ago
0

JJM,
These may not be quick/condensed lists, but these books have some good info;
1) Healing Herbs and Spices: The Most Popular Herbs and Spices, Their Culinary and Medicinal Uses and Recipes to Use Them In
$8.99 – Barnes & Noble
2) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Herbs Their Medicinal And Culinary Uses
$8.00 – eBay
Hope this helps.
Peace Be With You,
Blessed Be,
Brthr Lee

Cheryl O.
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Cheryl O.
3 years 3 months ago
0 I really use a lot of ginger. I have been buying many of these seasonings listed as well as others like Smoked Paprika, Curry, Cloves, Nutmeg (bought whole to file off on demand)mixed apple pie spice, and Pumpkin pie spice. The pie spices can be used to flavor teas, coffee, and hot chocolate as well. I grow a lot of my own herbs but living in growing zone 4, bordering on 3, I am limited to what does well here. I have purchased a LOT of seasonings both mixed as well as individuals by the pound from places like… Read more »
JayJay
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JayJay
3 years 3 months ago
0

I make my own pumpkin pie spice:
2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. ginger
1/2 tsp. ground allspice
Since it isn’t a frequent need, I only make the above amt.

sally
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sally
3 years 3 months ago
0

No one —either before or after the SHTF—-should be without a good stock of turmeric aka “Curry powder”. It is an excellent antioxidant (one of the best known in the world) and can be used not just to enhance the flavor of food but to fight diseases such as dementia and joint pain.
I take it daily.
If stranded on a deserted island, it would be amongst my top five items to have.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/04/26/the-spice-that-actually-doubles-as-a-powerful-antiinflammatory.aspx

joyce
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joyce
3 years 3 months ago
0

Curry is a blend – not just tumeric. You can adjust how hot by adjusting the mustard and cayenne. Here is the recipe I use:
Makes about 1/2 cup
Ingredients
2 tablespoons whole cumin seeds, toasted
2 tablespoons whole cardamom seeds, toasted
2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds, toasted
1/4 cup ground turmeric
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon cayenne

Directions

Place all ingredients in a container with an airtight lid. Shake to combine. Store in a cool dry place for up to 6 months. When ready to use, grind and add to dishes according to taste.

Laurel
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Laurel
3 years 3 months ago
0

and Fenugreek in the curry. Also a great medicinal seed.

pat
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pat
3 years 3 months ago
0

Turmeric is also known to stop bleeding. I keep a small container in my car in case of accident as well as in the house.

Nick
Guest
3 years 3 months ago
0

I can’t go without Zatarain’s Blackening and Cavendar’s original greek seasoning! Both useful on everything from meat to squash!

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