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Cast Iron Cooking

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Cast Iron Cooking

Not Cooking With Cast Iron? You Don’t Know What You’re Missing.

When it comes to cooking, one of the best items you can have in your pantry or on your rack is a good solid cast iron skillet.

Cast iron is one of the most durable forms of cookware around, and if you know how to use it, it can provide some of the best tasting foods you can imagine.

My family has used cast iron cookware for as long as I can remember and there is just something nostalgic about cooking with it, regardless of whether I am cooking eggs over a campfire or baking biscuits in the oven.

Check out Cast Iron Cooking at http://survivallife.com/cast-iron-cooking/

There are some big benefits of using a cast iron skillet…

  • Durability
    Some cast iron skillets are still in use today that were crafted well over a century ago. With proper care, there is no reason that your skillet shouldn’t last at least several decades.
  • Flexibility
    Cast iron skillets can be used over an open flame, on a grill, on a gas range, in the oven, and even on electric ranges. I have found that cast irons work best over a flame, but I have an electric oven and it works quite well on that too. This is one of the best factors when thinking about keeping cast iron in your survival supplies.  You can cook with it no matter what heat source you have.
  • Heat Retention and Dispersion
    A properly made cast iron skillet will evenly disperse the heat and allow for cooking without worrying about hot spots unlike aluminum and steel cookware. This is a huge deal if you have to cook over an open flame where the flames will only kiss the bottom of the pan and not have the constant regulated heat of a stovetop.
  • Iron
    Cooking on a cast iron skillet will leach a bit of iron into your meals, up to a few milligrams per item cooked. In a survival situation you will need as much iron as you can get, especially if you are in any way anemic.

The first cast iron skillet that I bought was an  8” flat bottom skillet from Lodge, simply because they are a made in the USA product and Lodge has been crafting cast iron skillets since 1896. They are pretty much the name in cast iron and readily available at most stores.

They are also relatively inexpensive, the 8” skillet bringing in a whopping $10.00 bottom line. My skillet has lasted me about 3 years so far, and aside from a little mishap with olive oil (see below) I have never had any problems cooking with it.

Lodge makes a very well-crafted product that will last for decades or longer with proper care.



A little note on proper care…

It is good practice to re-season your cast iron pans about once a year.

When re-seasoning your pan NEVER use olive oil, always use oils and fats with high smoke points. I prefer to use Crisco and I like to season my pans inside my grill to avoid any mess.

Olive oil has too low of a smoke point to be an effective seasoning agent. It will create an acrid smoke and absolutely ruin the season and finish of your skillet. If you do use olive oil, all you will need to do is strip and re-season your pan.

Never use soap on your cast iron. Soap will ruin your seasoning on the pan.

Never take your pan from a heat source and drench it in cold water, doing so will shock the pan and cause it to crack or shatter.

The major drawback to cast iron skillets is size and weight. I chose the  8” flat bottom skillet from Lodge because it has a “light” weight of about 4lbs with a small size that is easily storable. Lodge makes a large array of cast iron products, and if you have the space to store them and are okay with their weight (i.e. you don’t plan on carrying them far), a cast iron skillet is a necessity when it comes to prepping your survival kitchen.

Ready to get cooking with cast iron? Check out these 20 mouthwatering cast iron skillet recipes. And if you’re still not satisfied, these cast iron skillet dessert recipes are sure to please your sweet tooth.

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Barry
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Barry
3 years 7 months ago
0

We have 2 10″ skillet’s and 2 3 quart Dutch Ovens. One oven I inherited from an Uncle who only cooked fish in it and left the same grease in it for years I guess, because when i got it, it was half full of fish grease. I sand blasted, scrubbed, used hot soapy water and put charcoal briquets in it trying to get the taste and smell out. Nothing worked.But I have washed mine in hot soapy water, and let air dry for years with no problems. I even make spaghetti in them.
Guess I have been lucky.

Craig
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Craig
3 years 7 months ago
0 Hey Berry, wasn’t quite sure if you were trying to get the fishy taste & smell out or the cast flavor. Anyway’s, try to take and mix dish soap and vinegar with your water and let the pan sit in it for awhile. Then take and scrub it out good using a rough dish spoonge. You may have to do this a couple of times. After doing that and drying the pan good, take the pan and poor some cooking oil into it and set it on the stove letting it heat up good while swishing the oil up… Read more »
Craig
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Craig
3 years 7 months ago
0

Oop’s, sorry about the “e” in your name Barry.

Ken
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Ken
3 years 5 months ago
0 Barry, you may have to take the fishy dutch oven and completely burn it out in a fire to remove the lingering fishy smell. Let it cool completely in the ashes, then clean it and reseason it. Burning cast iron will also get rid of all of the burned on ‘gunk’ which collects on the bottom of skillets over the years. I have done this for many years. Just remember the iron will begin to rust after it cools, so clean and reseason it immediately. For odors which are not as bad as your fishy pot, try cleaning the… Read more »
Janet
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Janet
3 years 7 months ago
0

If you can’t use soap, how do you clean it. I remember my grandmother using soap and water.

steve
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steve
3 years 7 months ago
0

If you wash it you will not only remove the hard coating (oil that was used during curing),but also the tiny particles of food that over time will make the surface even smoother. Don’t worry about bacteria cooking will kill it. If there is something sticking use table salt,and a little cooking oil on a rag to “sand” it off.

Jane
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Jane
3 years 7 months ago
0 I’ve been using my two “oldest” cast iron skillets for over thirty years. I purchased them used, knowing they will last virtually forever. I also have two Lodge Dutch ovens, two muffin pans, a griddle, and a larger 12 inch skillet purchased more recently (about 15 years ago). Cast iron is easy to cook with and makes great tasting food. Just wipe out with a dry paper towel or rinse clean in very hot water. I’ve used soapy water to clean the skillets, and air dried without problems. However, reseasoning will solve any problems if soaked too long. Coconut… Read more »
Tom
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Tom
3 years 7 months ago
0

I have Dutch ovens,skillets.griddles,and potje pots (South African kettles) that I have used for over thirty years.If it can’t be cooked in cast iron or grilled it’s probably best not eat it! My daughter is already trying to talk out of them. Maybe another thirty years I’ll think about it. Except for the the potje pots the are all LODGE products,I won’t use any other

Dave
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Dave
3 years 7 months ago
0

I had a set of cast iron cookware, up to a 12″ skillet. Gave them away when my daughter in law sold pampered Chef. Big mistake! I would trade the PC for caast iron if I could find someone who doesn’t know any better. Shame on me.

DHConner
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DHConner
3 years 7 months ago
0 Yeah, my sympathy to you. Pampered Chef is about 96% junk. Have a niece that got into that-made a bunch of money, went to Orlando Disney,yada yada. Thing is,it’s a pyramid scheme that relies on your intial customers bringing their friends and on down the line. The only things I saw, and she had it all, were the cast stoneware items, and overpriced at that. She was kind enough to give a couple pieces, and they are ok. The rest it looks like great stuff but is very low quality. Kind of like the girl working the corner–looks good… Read more »
David LeVine
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3 years 7 months ago
0

A word of warning: DO NOT use PAM or any other cooking spray with silicone oil in it on a cast iron pan. It will prevent proper seasoning after application.

The cheap canola oil/lecithin based sprays are fine.

John Bowie
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John Bowie
3 years 7 months ago
0

Ever wonder what “canola oil” actually was? You might want to research it bewfore you use it……man made synthetic products kill.

William Lollar
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William Lollar
2 years 6 months ago
0

Canola oil has taken a bad rap from a lot of internet hoaxes. This article from the Mayo Clinic might help clarify.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/canola-oil/AN01281

Brian
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Brian
3 years 7 months ago
0 I ‘inherited’ an 8″ cast iron skillet my parents got for their wedding in 1966. My dad kept it when they divorced and when he died I got it. I still use it regularly and have added a 10″ and 12″ to the collection. I HAVE other skillets/pans, but don’t use them. The cast skillets are all WELL seasoned and virtually non-stick (my teen son who tries to ‘flash fry’ everything can occasionally ‘get’ something to stick, but that’s it). I never use soap and rarely use water of ANY temp on them. I season AND clean them with… Read more »
Janet
Guest
3 years 7 months ago
0

This is great, as a Kentucky woman, many delicious meals have come out of iron cookware and enjoyed immendsly. Thank you for sharing, it’s the little tidbits of experience that makes the difference. SRDC’s http://www.srdcBlog.com has a very similiar objective, and that is to help people make the most of what they have. Surviving good times and bad times is a lot easier when you know how to use properly your iron skillet! Good job !

DHConner
Guest
DHConner
3 years 7 months ago
0

Hurry up and get that recipe on here!! My Granma did the same thing and I don’t think anybody could lift a stick big enough to beat those biscuts.She’s gone on ahead, and I expect when we next meet she’ll have a big old pan of chicken gravy and biscuts.

CONNIE
Guest
CONNIE
3 years 7 months ago
0

HI JOE. I WOULD LIKE THAT RECIPE IF YOU DON’T MIND. MY GRANDMOTHER DIED BEFORE I COULD GET IT OUT OF HER.

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